Baby Basics NYC

 
 

These little feet could use a helping hand...

Please visit the Program page to make an online donation.

Thank you!

  

 

Did you know...  

  • Half of the babies born in NYC today are born into poverty.**
  • Children age 3 and younger are the most frequent victims of child abuse and neglect.***
  • In NY state between 1990 and 2005, the number of working poor families increased by 75%*
 

Baby Basics NYC is a non-profit 501(c)(3) 100% volunteer organization dedicated to helping low-income working families and their children on the UWS of Manhattan, NYC. Our mission is to promote healthy early childhood care and positive parenting by consistently providing community connection, education and diapers to working poor families. Diapers, a basic fundamental necessity, are expensive for financially stressed families who are struggling to make ends meet in NYC, and their children can be at risk.

Baby Basics NYC is more than just a diaper bank; families who qualify for our program must consistently attend meetings to connect with other families and with volunteers who offer help and guidance in baby care, parenting and wellness. This connection, or mentoring, is just as important as diapers to our families, the moms especially who tend to isolate when caring for their young children.

Baby Basics Inc., a national mission, knows that early intervention with infants is one of the best ways to prevent later failure to thrive. Poor hygiene can lead to stunted development, diaper rash, discomfort, crying and very unfortunately, child abuse. At risk children and their parents need help and community. 

100% of revenue generated by donations is applied to purchasing diapers. Administrative costs are underwritten by donations earmarked as such.

** Keeping Track of NYC's Children, Citizens Committee for Children of New York, Inc., 2002 (statistic refers to families receiving Medicaid at birth)
*** National Clearing House on Child Abuse and Neglect Information, April 2004
* Fiscal Policy Institute, The State of Working New York: Encouraging Gains but Troubling Trends, September 2007